9 best recommended grounding practices for safety and power quality

June 26th, 2015 | Make a comment | Posted in Electrical Safety
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grounding practices for safety and power quality 1

Grounding is the most important factor that governs the safety and the quality of a power system.

That’s on what Steven Mill wants to write today. Will you agree with his guidelines for safety and power quality?

“Grounding, also known as earthing, provides a safe way for the fault currents to pass on to the ground (neutral). This avoids sudden voltage spikes in the distributed network system, safeguarding the electrical equipment from permanent or premature failure. Grounding systems are generally designed keeping low-impedance paths in mind.

When a fault occurs, a low-impedance current flow path can result in discharging high volumes of current into the ground pretty quickly, keeping the equipment safe. Grounding also plays a vital role in transferring transients caused due to lightning strikes into the ground safely and quickly.”

Following are the recommended grounding practices according to me and maybe to you all:
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Top 10 causes for power system failures (part2)

June 18th, 2015 | Make a comment | Posted in Electrical distribution
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Part 1 was about pure electricity, now discover the other causes which are quite surprising!

Tree Contact

power-system-failures-tree-contactTrees that grow very near to the electric poles can pose a lot of threats. They can fall on vital electrical erections during heavy storms, drop branches on conductors, couple two conductors together and can also provide access to various animals that can cause disturbances to the power supply.

This is the reason why most power distribution companies invest a lot of time and money in trimming dangerous trees as a part of preventive maintenance.

When a wet tree branch connects two conductors, current flows for one conductor the other, through the branch slowly.
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Top 10 causes for power system failures (part1)

June 15th, 2015 | 1 Comment | Posted in Electrical distribution
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Top 10 Causes For Power System Failures pt1

Hi everybody, it’s Steven Mill! Today I come to you with a 2 part articles about power system failures.

It is very important to understand the reasons behind these, if you were to understand the root causes that govern the reliability of a power system.

This article deals with all those important reasons on which the reliability of a power system depends.

Following are the top 10 causes for power system failures:

  1. Cables laid beneath/Underground cables
  2. Transformer breakdowns
  3. Lightning
  4. Tree Contact
  5. Birds
  6. Squirrels
  7. Snakes
  8. Insects
  9. Bears and cattle

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4 forms of partitioning low voltage switchboards – why is it necessary?

June 12th, 2015 | Make a comment | Posted in Electrical Safety
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Did you ever wonder about partitioning of low voltage switchboards? This important process is explained below by Eric S. who sent an article to the EEC team last week.

You too can be published in the blog, just send us a mail and we’ll discuss about it :)

Partitioning of low voltage switchboards is very important because of the following four important reasons:

partitioning low voltage switchboards
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Need for multiple transfer switches for emergency and standby power generation systems

June 8th, 2015 | 3 Comments | Posted in Electrical Safety
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Hi everybody, today let’s discover this article about power supply for emergencies and standby power generation systems. It was nicely sent by an active reader of the blog.

multiple transfer switches for emergency and standby power generation systems 1Automatic multiple transfer switches are widely used in most emergency and standby power generating systems, because of their reliability.
Some of these automatic multiple transfer switches also support over current protection and are designed as per the guidelines stated in NEC, which are deemed as yardsticks, as far as measuring the standards within the electrical industry is concerned.

These transfer switches are held mechanically, and are operated electrically, directly from the power source. They are known to transfer the load to the electrical equipment with greater reliability and accuracy when compared to the conventional switches. These switches are normally placed at the mains or at the secondary bus distribution terminal, and are responsible to feed the load to various branch circuits.
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