Selection of Miniature Circuit Breaker

April 15th, 2014 | Make a comment | Posted in Electrical distribution
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Thanks to Manish, another member of the electrical engineering community, for sending us this article about MCBs. Remember you can also send us articles about the topic you want by a mail

MCB stands for Miniature Circuit Breaker. It is a vital circuit breaking component found in today’s modern electrical distribution system. It replaces earlier method of circuit breaking done via melting fuse wire.

A melting fuse wire system is replaceable type of circuit breaking in which the fuse wire melts and permanently breaks the circuit upon an overload current event. Due to this hence it is quite cumbersome to each time replace and fix a new fuse wire.

A miniature circuit breaker on other hand is reusable type of circuit breaking device that is nowadays widely used in homes and offices.

Working Principle

While the main purpose of this article is about selection of MCBs, it is worth summarizing the working principle of MCBs in brief.

MCB is a compact cased device that has an electro-mechanical mechanism inside that provides overload protection.

There are essentially three different mechanisms inside that provide overload protection:

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Introduction to Laplace Transform

April 11th, 2014 | Make a comment | Posted in Panel Building
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Check the next part of Nasir’s tutorial on Control Systems. What do you know about Laplace Transform?

Definition

Laplace transformation converts differential and integral equations into rather simple algebraic equations. Laplace transform is nothing but a simple operational tool, used to solve linear differential equations with constant coefficients.

The transformation is only applied to general signals and not to sinusoidal signals. Also, it cannot handle steady state conditions. It enables us to study complicated control systems with integrators, differentiators and gains.

On basis of Laplace transformation we analyze LCCODE’s and circuits with several sources, inductors, resistors and capacitors.

For a given function f (t) such that t Introduction to Laplace Transform_symbol1 0, its Laplace transformation is written as F(s) = L {f (t)} and is written as:

Introduction to Laplace Transform_1

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Transient Response Analysis of Control Systems

April 8th, 2014 | Make a comment | Posted in Panel Building
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Check our loyal member Nasir’s last article from his tutorial on Control Systems.

Introduction

As we discussed earlier there are two ways to analyze the functioning of a control system, time domain and frequency domain analysis. In time-domain analysis the response of a dynamic system to an input is expressed as a function of time. The time response can only be analyzed when the model of system plus nature of input signals are known.

AS the input signals are usually not comprehended completely ahead of time, it is difficult to express the input signals through simple mathematical equations. The behavior of a system that is dynamic in nature is analyzed under typical test signals. These signals are an impulse, a step, a constant velocity and constant acceleration. Another signal is sinusoidal which is of great importance.

There are two components of time response of a system:

  1. Steady-state response
  2. Transient response

Transient Response Analysis of Control Systems1

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Metal Organic Framework and its impact on electronics

April 4th, 2014 | Make a comment | Posted in Others
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New article by one of our devoted members Steven Mill, who wants to tell you about Metal Organic Framework (MOF).

Definition and Formation of MOFs

Molecular organic frameworks or the MOFs are the compounds made up of metals ions and ligands that are linked to organic molecules in order to make a spongy structure.

Metal Organic Framework and its impact on electronics 1

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Introduction to Second Order Systems

April 2nd, 2014 | Make a comment | Posted in Panel Building
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Next article of Nasir from his tutorial on Control Systems.

Introduction

As we discussed earlier we have two methods of analyzing the working and functioning of a control system named as:

  • Time domain analysis
  • Frequency domain analysis

The time domain analyzes the functioning of the system on basis of time. This analysis can only be applied when nature of input plus mathematical model of the control system is known. Expressing the main input signals is not an easy task and cannot be determined by simple equations. There are two components of any system’s time response, which are:

  • Transient response
  • Steady state response

In order to judge the functioning and behavior of a system, typical and standard test signals are used. The characteristics of an input signal are constant acceleration, constant velocity, a sudden change or a sudden shock. We have already discussed four types of test signals i.e.

  • Impulse
  • Step
  • Ramp
  • Parabolic

We already discussed first order systems in detail in the previous article. It said that the system whose input-output equation is a first order differential equation is called a first order system. In this article we will be focusing on second order systems.

Second Order Systems

Introduction to Second Order Systems 1

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