Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
CALCULATION OF KVA RATING OF WELDING T/F WITHOUT NAME PLATE
2011/06/16
4:16 pm
G S DAS
Guest

DEAR ENGINEERS

 

 CAN YOU GIVE ME A SUITABLE WAY TO CALCULATE THE KVA RATING OF A WELDING MACHINE HAVING NO NAME PLATE

 

ALSO HOW CAN WE UNDERSTAND THE CAPACITOR CONNECTED IN COMBINATION WITH A POWER EQUIPEMENT IS PROPERLY WORKING?

2011/06/29
5:24 pm
Sunny Boy
New Member
Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
2010/11/29
Offline

Hi

If there is a transformer in your welding machine you may calculate transformers power. I found one very approximate equation for calculating real power of a transformer.

P=A*A, where A is cross section of transformers core.

 

I usually test capacitors with current clamps. I use Fluke 345 which can actually measure the amount of active and reactive power consumed by a capacitor. You can compare measured data with data on capacitors nameplate.

If you have ordinary clamp meter you may assume that all current is reactive. With use of reactive current, voltage and nominal capacity you can calculate actual reactive power of capacitor. But note that capacitors power is proportional to voltage squared (U*U).

 I hope that this information is useful.

 

Best regards,

Miha

2011/06/29
8:08 pm
Mike
Guest

Sunny Boy said:

Hi

If there is a transformer in your welding machine you may calculate transformers power. I found one very approximate equation for calculating real power of a transformer.

P=A*A, where A is cross section of transformers core.

 

I usually test capacitors with current clamps. I use Fluke 345 which can actually measure the amount of active and reactive power consumed by a capacitor. You can compare measured data with data on capacitors nameplate.

If you have ordinary clamp meter you may assume that all current is reactive. With use of reactive current, voltage and nominal capacity you can calculate actual reactive power of capacitor. But note that capacitors power is proportional to voltage squared (U*U).

 I hope that this information is useful.

 

Best regards,

Miha


G S DAS said:

DEAR ENGINEERS

 

 CAN YOU GIVE ME A SUITABLE WAY TO CALCULATE THE KVA RATING OF A WELDING MACHINE HAVING NO NAME PLATE

 

ALSO HOW CAN WE UNDERSTAND THE CAPACITOR CONNECTED IN COMBINATION WITH A POWER EQUIPEMENT IS PROPERLY WORKING?


Measure the current and voltage.

kVA = volts x amps. 1-phase

kVA = 1.732 x volts x amps – 3-phase

2011/06/30
7:26 am
ramzy2006
New Member
Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
2011/05/31
Offline

Dear

For the above mentioned, the situation depend on if you have electric measuring instrument or not, if yes what you have then you can decide

In a present of jus clamp meter you can measure the current and volt

KVA =V*I

If you have just multi-meter reading ohm and volt

You can calculate the resistance of the welding machine direct=R

Then

KVA = V2/R

2011/10/08
1:53 pm
ta2
Guest

Welding Machine commonly rated in amperes. And most of welding machine have 50V secondary winding or use a volt meter to measure it exactly. To calculate the kVA=(ampere rating x secondary voltage) / 1000.

Forum Timezone: UTC 1

Most Users Ever Online: 1178

Currently Online:
31 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Spir Georges GHALI: 204

Steven Mill: 86

jatin333: 36

electricalexpert65: 33

Chris2011: 32

Ally Kanyondo: 28

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1204

Members: 16262

Moderators: 4

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 2

Topics: 1018

Posts: 3360

Newest Members: jaya jai, m qasim jan, makanjuola L I, Sabyasachi Mandal, abusaeed, s md irfan

Moderators: Laurent (70), Sudeep (18), Nawaz (12), erickench (38)

Administrators: admin (121)

Electrical engineering Community is proudly powered by WordPress
Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS) and license Creative Commons License